Class 10: Promote Active Viewing

Promote Active Viewing

This week our focus will be designing lessons around existing video content. There’s so much video content out there , but you need to help students truly interact with the video content, rather than passively consuming it. 


First – take a quick look at ViewPure – share video content with students without related sidebar video suggestions. 
Click here to “purify” a video.
This is a great tool to shelter your students from nasty YouTube content that may only be a few clicks away.


In this lesson we will use EdPuzzle. It’s a free web-based tool that you can use to pick a video, add your magical touch and track your students’ understanding. It allows you to add questions, audio and notes to existing videos from Y ouTube, Khan Academy, Crash Course and more. If you’d rather record and upload your own video, go for it!

Create a free teacher account at EdPuzzle.
Follow these steps to create an account, a test class, and make content

Here’s a guide to using EdPuzzle (plus more info here)

Here’s how to get an embed code from EdPuzzle to use with HTML Snippets
Courtesy of Claire
ASSIGNMENT | EdPuzzles 20-A10

Use EdPuzzle to turn a video into a lesson.

  • You can use a video you create or a video you find on the internet.
  • Your EdPuzzle should include a variety of questions, comments and notes. How about a voice over?
  • Embed into a WordPress post that includes a written description of the audience and purpose of your lesson. 
  • As always, be sure to include a featured image and clever title for your post.
  • Need Ideas? Here’s 6 Ways to Use Edpuzzle for Elementary Students

Class 12: Promote Active Viewing

Promote Active Viewing

This week our focus will be designing lessons around existing video content. There’s so much video content out there – here’s four tools you can use to associate questions, comments, quizzes and notes with specific passages in a video. You can help students truly interact with the video content, rather than passively consuming it.

Students will work in teams to evaluate five apps that all assist teachers in turning videos into lessons. Each video lesson builder has different features that allow teachers to annotate and add instruction content to existing video. They also have different assets and liabilities. Students will have a chance to explore the five apps in small groups. Groups will then briefly share their appraisal. Students will then select an app to use for this week’s assignment.

First off – a quick nod to ViewPure – an easy way to share video content with students without “risking” related sidebar content. Click here to “purify” a video.

Then here’s our four video lesson builders.

  1. TEDed – build a lesson around any TEDed original, TED talk or YouTube video
  2. EdPuzzle – Pick a video, add your magical touch and track your students’ understanding
  3. VideoAnt – Use VideoAnt to add annotations, or comments, to web-hosted videos.
  4. Vialogues – A free service that allows you to build online discussions around videos hosted online

More resources:

Assignment | Post 19-A12

Use one of the five video lesson apps to turn a video into a lesson. You can use a video you create or a video you find on the internet.  In the post include a written description of the audience and purpose of your lesson.

Here’s how to get your finished annotated video into your WordPress post.

  1. TEDed – TEDed does not provide an embed feature. So you can take a screenshot of your TEDed lesson and use it in you post with a hyperlink to the full lesson.
  2. EdPuzzle – Get an embed code and use with HTML snippets
  3. VideoAnt – Get an embed code and use with HTML snippets
  4. Vialogues – Get an embed code and use with HTML snippets

Class 11: Turn Videos into Lessons

Because video is such a powerful and versatile instructional tool we have devoted three classes to different methods of video creation:

One we didn’t mention: You can create a slide presentation (Keynote, Powerpoint, Google slides) and then export it as a video. You can even record your narration as you move through the slides. (I think Keynote is the easiest to use).

This week our focus will shift from creating videos to designing lessons around existing video content. The same tools can be used to build a lesson using video you created or a video posted by someone else. That’s good news since there’s so much video content out there.

Students will work in teams to evaluate three apps that all assist teachers in turning videos into lessons. Each video lesson builder has different features that allow teachers to annotate and add instruction content to existing video. They also have different assets and liabilities. Students will have a chance to explore the three apps in small groups and then select an app to use for this week’s assignment.

First off – a quick nod to ViewPure – an easy way to share video content with students without “risking” related sidebar content. Click here to “purify” a video.

Then here’s our three comparative video lesson builders.

  1. TEDed – build a lesson around any TEDed original, TED talk or YouTube video
  2. EdPuzzle – Pick a video, add your magical touch and track your students’ understanding
  3. VideoAnt – Use VideoAnt to add annotations, or comments, to web-hosted videos.

More resources:

Assignment Due Tues April 10th | Completed work

Use one of the three video lesson apps to turn a video into a lesson. You can use a video you create or a video you find on the internet.  Note: VideoAnt and EdPuzzle both provide embed codes that you can add to your post. TEDed does not provide an embed feature. So you can take a screenshot of your TEDed lesson and use it in you post with a hyperlink to the full lesson.

Class 7: Create and Share Content

Note: We will begin class by using this Google form to assess progress on our Critical Thinking Design Project.

Today’s class is the second in our three-class exploration of blended and flipped learning. Last week we looked at options for screencasting / slidecasting. This week we’ll look add a few more options for teachers or students to create content. Students will practice their skills in preparation for our next class where we will look at how to incorporate blended / flipped content into lesson design.

There many options for creating content – but here’s two categories and some free tools that will have many application for lesson designers.

Techniques we’ve already used

  1. Create content using VoiceThread and share with student. Shoot your own video – edit with iMovie. See class 5.
  2. Use Mac’s QuickTime Player or CaptureSpace to create a screencast / slidecast. See class 6

Create and share slides

  1. Export Powerpoint or Keynote slides to Slideshare  – sample by former student Peter Gallagher. Peter’s extensive collection of Slideshares.
  2. Here’s how to add an audio narration to a PowerPoint or a Keynote slide show.
  3. Use Google slides  – here’s an example of how to animate a math problem. Here’s a hack for adding a narration to Google slides.

Create and share videos

  1. Add narration to  PowerPoint or Keynote (#2 above) Then export as videos which can be shared as files or uploaded to YouTube. This is the technique Jeremy used to make his slidecast)
  2. Create a Paperslide video
  3. Create an animation using Toontastic 3d. It’s fun and a free tool from Google that works on smartphones, tablets, and select Chromebooks. Other animation creation options with free intro levels are Plotagon or Powtoon.

Host video content (created by you or found online) in a lesson
Add your commentary / questions, monitor student responses.

  1. Use EDPuzzle (includes library of lessons you can use)
    – Works with YouTube, Vimeo.
    – Has shortcuts to many popular videos series including: , Khan A, Numberphile, Crashcourse, National Geographic and more.
    – Can be embedded.
    – Sample Grade 3: Mathablanca
  2. Use TEDed (includes library of lessons you can use)
    – YouTube content only.
    – Cannot be embedded.
    – Sample: Who’s the Historian in Your Classroom

To simply share your YouTube or Vimeo videos without nuisances such as annotations and related videos using SafeShare.TV

Image credit: Creative Commons / Adobe Spark