Recognize a Rhyme – Google Form

Target Student Group: Third Grade

Student Instructions:

As a warm up today, follow this link, https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf0tN-j3vmJ0PAiOLMvoHxVImg-M4K9GbLonGNwRyLdkJsgog/viewform?usp=sf_link

Then take a look at these multiple choice questions. Choose the answer you think has two words that rhyme. When you’re done, check your work. If you missed one, try again! Remember read them out loud and listen for those similar sounds.

Goal:

To prompt students to identify and recognize rhyme as we continue into our poetry unit.

This will help guide students toward the state standard:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.3.4.B

Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive reading.

Teacher Notes:

  • This can be adjusted for grade level to be more challenging or simpler.
  • It can also be adjusted as a more formal assessment for the younger grades.

Featured Photo: Photo by Brett Jordan on Unsplash

4 Replies to “Recognize a Rhyme – Google Form”

  1. A fun activity. English pronunciation is such a tricky thing to master. So many unusual sound variations

    Reminds me of Hinky-Pinky. A riddle game we used to play all the time. Might me something to use to expand the idea of its lesson.

  2. I really enjoyed in the google form how you made sure the matching of words contains some that look different both physically in size, and letter arraignment. That was something I really struggled with in learning about rhymes.

  3. Marissa,
    I agree with Dom. I liked the choice of word pairings.
    If this is being used for a study tool: if students get it wrong, you could also put in an audio file showing them what each word sounds like too.

  4. I like this as a warm up. Not only is it easy to throw together, but it also helps to illustrate where you as the teacher need to spend more time in the lesson. With it not being long it won’t take much time out of instruction, and with the data you would be able to see what most kids miss and either start there, or spend more time there. I also like the instruction to say the words, that gives everyone a chance to talk at the beginning of class, and maybe have questions about some of the rhymes. The Who and True rhyme is a really good one, as they rhyme but don’t look like they would.

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