It’s Not Just Sound!

Welcome, 5th graders! Today we’ll be taking a look at volume~
Lesson 1:
– What is it?
– What types of things have it?
– Scavenger Hunt!
Lesson 2:
– How do we measure it?
– Practice counting!


Lesson 1: Introduction to Volume

Learning Objectives:
1.) I can define volume.
2.) I can list and explain examples of things that have volume.

What is Volume?
Volume is how loud or quiet a sound is:
– Example: Hearing your alarm clock at max volume (and not wanting to get out of bed).


But volume is ALSO the amount of space inside a three-dimensional object.
This is the definition we’ll be using in Math.
Let’s break this definition down! 🙂


Reviewing Dimensions:
Think of one-dimensional (1D) as lines!
– It’s 1D because only one dimension is being measured (Length)

Think of two-dimensional (2D) as flat shapes!
– It’s 2D because two dimensions are being measured (Length, Height)

Think of three-dimensional (3D) as thicker shapes!
– It’s 3D because three dimensions are being measured (Length, Height, Width)

Let’s look at the pictures below for some examples 🙂

1D – these lines can only be measured via Length
2D – these flat shapes (triangles) can be measured via Length and Height
3D – these thicker shapes (pyramids) can be measured via Length, Height, and Width

Lines (1D) are just that! Lines!
Flat shapes (2D) include squares and rectangles. Can you think of any other 2D shapes?
Thicker shapes (3D) include cubes and rectangular prisms. Can you think of any others?


Let’s go back to our definition of volume, now that we’ve reviewed dimensions.
Volume: the amount of space inside a three-dimensional object.

So, what are some examples of things that have volume?

Let’s look at this Coca Cola 🙂
Is the picture on the left an example of volume? What about the one on the right?
Go back to our definition of volume in green.
Think about it for a little bit BEFORE scrolling down.

Volume: the amount of space inside a three-dimensional object.

The empty glass on the left…
IS an example of volume! It’s 3D (has Length, Height, and Width), and has space inside of it. In this case, the air is the space/volume.

The Coca Cola on the right…
IS ALSO an example of volume! It’s 3D (has Length, Height, and Width), and has space inside of it. In this case, the Coca Cola liquid and the air at the top are the space/volume.


Now it’s your turn! 🙂
Find some objects around your home that have volume.
Comment WHAT objects you found, and WHY they’re an example of volume.


Review Lesson 1 Learning Objectives:
1.) I can define volume.
2.) I can list and explain examples of things that have volume.

How successful do you feel with these objectives?
Leave a comment with any questions before moving on to lesson 2 🙂


Lesson 2: Measuring Volume

Let’s review what we learned in Lesson 1 🙂
Volume: the amount of space inside a three-dimensional object.

So if we’re measuring the space inside of three-dimensional objects to find the volume, our next question is… How do we measure that space?


Learning Objectives:
1.) I can explain what unit cubes are.
2.) I can count volume using unit cubes.


A unit cube helps us measure volume. It looks like a cube!
By counting how many unit cubes are in a 3D object, that will tell us what the volume is.
Let’s practice counting 🙂
How many unit cubes are in each picture?

Image 1: One unit cube
Image 2: Four unit cubes
Image 3: Four unit cubes (don’t forget the pink cube in the back!)


Now imagine filling these unit cubes into a container.
Depending on how many fit in one, that will tell us the volume of that container!

Can you try to solve how many unit cubes make up this Rubix Cube? 🙂
(Hint: Remember our Length x Height x Width formula?)


Review Lesson 2 Learning Objectives:
1.) I can explain what unit cubes are.
2.) I can count volume using unit cubes.

How successful do you feel with these objectives?
Leave a comment with any questions 🙂


Featured Image by Zak Neilson on Unsplash
Cat photo by Kate Stone Matheson on Unsplash
Line photo by Alex Holliman on Unsplash
Triangles photo by Joel Filipe on Unsplash
Pyramid photo by boesijana on Unsplash
Empty Coke photo by Dimitri Houtteman on Unsplash
Full Coke photo by Jonathan Borba on Unsplash
Binoculars photo by Jen Theodore on Unsplash
Box photo by Brandable Box on Unsplash
Ice cubes photo by sheri silver on Unsplash
Colorful cubes photo by Sigmund on Unsplash
White Rubix Cube photo by pure julia on Unsplash

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.