Phonics Fun Exit Ticket

Phonics Fun Exit Ticket

Letter Image by Surendran MP from Unsplash

Today’s Jamboard activity is an exit ticket that helps 1st grade students practices their phonics and identifying short vowel sounds. Students are provided with 8 pictures to sort under the corresponding category that matches the short vowel sound in the word provided by the teacher. Students would log on to Jamboard and complete this activity individually as an exit ticket at the end of the phonics lesson for the day.

Instructions for students:

  1. Good job first graders! You all did great with today’s phonics instruction and practicing identifying short vowel sounds.
  2. For your exit ticket today, we will be looking at short-a and short-i sounds and using pictures to represent words.
  3. Open up the Jamboard and sit quietly at your desk when you have it open on your screen.
  4. We are going to be looking at the words fan and lip today.
  5. Using the pictures in the bottom left corner under “words to sort”, sort each picture under the correct short vowel sound.
  6. Once you are done, raise your hand and we will go over the answers together as a class.

Goal for this lesson:

The goal for this lesson is for students to recognize short-a and short-i vowel sounds in different words. This lesson helps students recognize short vowel sounds and patterns.

https://jamboard.google.com/d/1b8Gn3qOiG7EhEbUNOvMsXV76hacYpZ7yMHxeT4umAcA/edit?usp=sharing

2 Replies to “Phonics Fun Exit Ticket”

  1. Hi Kaelyn! I also chose to do an activity on phonics and I think Jamboard really lends itself to word sorts because of how easy it is for students to manipulate. I like how you are using this as an exit ticket, which is a great way to assess student understanding. The photos you picked are great and I can see students really enjoying this activity!

  2. Hailey, a good idea for using jamboard to help the “Littles” (short vowel) with their phonics. Would be fun for students to manipulate the images as an efficient check for understanding. I might suggest that you create some defined spaces for each sound. Might be easier for students to clarify their intent.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.