Fractions Exit Ticket

Okay, third graders! Before we close out our class for the day, I want you all to complete this Exit Ticket for me. (here)

There are two steps:

  1. Identify the 5 fractions provided. What portion of the shapes are colored in? Simplify when needed.
  2. Place the fractions in order from smallest to largest on the number line below.

Goals:

  • Students will be able to look at a provided image and identify the fraction.
  • Students can determine when a fraction needs to be simplified, and simplify it correctly.
  • Google Drawings is an easy way for teachers to design worksheets or activities that require shapes. It is easy to navigate for educators and students alike.
  • It is fun, unique, and different! Students will love looking at all of the different shapes and colors on this Google Drawings.

Photo Credit

  • Background image on Google Drawing (https://unsplash.com/photos/N7EL6Imnarg)
  • Featured Image (https://unsplash.com/photos/iLScUZafBzc)
  • Screenshot of Google Drawing Exit Ticket (Rachel Carbay)

3 Replies to “Fractions Exit Ticket”

  1. A good demonstration of how Google Drawings can both display content and integrate student work spaces. While this activity looks simple, it actually is filled with information for students to draw from. I like how students could go back and look at each drawing to help them order the fractions.

  2. This is a really great lesson! I love the different colors and shapes you used for your Google Drawing; I can really see this helping visual learners! I personally have trouble visualizing fractions sometimes. The number line at the bottom is also a great way to gauge how your students are understanding the lesson! Thank you for sharing!!

  3. Hi, Rachel!

    I love your activity! I also did mine on fractions since that’s what my 5th graders are about to start, but I liked how you used different shapes. That was something I didn’t do, but I think really important to show since it can kind of solidify that fractions can apply to all sorts of equal-sized shapes – not just circles and rectangles. I’ll definitely use more shape examples when I start teaching this unit. Thanks for sharing and for giving me this idea! 🙂

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